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Opinion

  • Consider the plight of two athletic programs, each on a different level, each in a different sport, but both with the same problem ... a leader who doesn’t know when to keep quiet and doesn’t know when to tell the truth.

  • The Supreme Court has heard the oral arguments about the Affordable Care Act, (Obamacare) and the justices have held their preliminary closed meeting. The Court will hand down its decision in June.
    In the meantime, even though we haven’t read the 2000 pages of the Affordable Care Act, bloggers, talk-show hosts, and columnists are exercising their opinions about the life or death of Obamacare. We consider our right to have opinions as sacred as freedom of speech.

  • Many years ago when I was working in Palatka, being a sports fan, I used to go to the basketball games at St. Johns River Junior College, which become a community college and is now a college.
    I often wondered why a “community” college had so many out-of-town players.
    Those questions cropped up again when I moved to Ocala. One time I looked at Central Florida Community College’s roster, and there were several players from Russia. I sarcastically asked, “What community are they serving … Minsk?”

  • No recent president has been able to down size government, because Congress and federal bureaucrats are in constant pursuit of new funding for lengthy shopping lists of so-called essential services. An example is the 2003 National Do Not Call Registry (DNCR).
    How could such a simple idea be so complicated that it requires 27 pages of explanations – basic information, definitions, subscriptions, renewals, downloading, and assistance? Answer: Requirements and regulations are the life-blood of secure federal employment and appeals for additional funding.

  • Remember Casey Anthony? Before she was charged, there was an outcry for justice. People demanded an arrest. So the state attorney’s office filed charges.
    Trouble is, the prosecutors didn’t have every bit of evidence in its proper place. The resulting trial was a disaster for them, and Casey Anthony is now a free woman, much to the dismay of all those who pushed for her to be jailed.

  • Nothing inspires a steamed-up column more than confusion about the nature of our government. This steamer was generated by letters in the daily papers about capitalism and democracy, neither of which has any status in our form of government.
    Adding to the misconceptions, a headline writer used the words “democratic republic” as a title caption to a letter. That is not now and never has been our form of government. However the future is uncertain.

  • Last week we complained about the lack of openness in the federal process concerning a complaint filed against a sheriff’s candidate.
    Today we go to the opposite end of the spectrum, a comment on how one local community is being very open about the candidates for its homeowners’ group.

  • Four years ago, during the presidential campaign, we heard a lot of talk about a "bridge to nowhere." The votes for that project still haunt some politicians today.
    Well, those folks have nothing on Marion County. We have roads to nowhere, lots of them, being built.
    Yes, they're all supposed to connect up someday to form a western bypass, but meanwhile, there are some perfectly good roads sitting there unusable, because they don't hook up with anything.

  • Invisible, irrelevant
    I read an article in the Tampa Bay Times dated March 8 where the Democrats in the Florida House and Senate feel that they are invisible and irrelevant. While this is true they must realize that the general electorate does not read or understand politics especially Florida politics where the minority rules.

  • Social Security is no longer the threatening third rail of American politics. Until the reforms of the Greenspan Commission in 1983, politicians did not dare fiddle with Social Security for fear of being electrocuted by voters at the next election.
    Based on the Commission’s recommendations, Congress raised the retirement age and extended the solvency of Social Security for 75 years to 2058. Unfortunately they’ve been very short years. More reform is on the horizon, and Social Security has few champions.

  • Fishing is not my favorite activity … actually, I’ve only been fishing once in my life, as a boy, caught some little fish up at Greenwood Lake, New York, watched him squirm, told my father to put him back in the water so he wouldn’t suffer, and never touched a rod and reel again.
    But I once had a fisherman describe the feeling the first time he went out in season, in the early morning on a peaceful lake, with nothing to concentrate on, except what he was doing. He said it was pure relaxation.

  • I have noticed an old scam that is starting again.

  • New initiatives to eliminate fraud, waste, and abuse in federal programs are usually accompanied by expectations of significant savings just over the rainbow. Early performance reports however are subject to lengthy questioning by Congress as to why the new program isn’t accomplishing more – and faster.

  • Those who drive to work early in the morning will have to face a dismal fact beginning next week. It’s going to be darker, later.
    This Sunday morning (or Saturday night), we go through the annual ritual of turning our clocks ahead. In the spring, that means we lose an hour’s sleep, and that the sun rises an hour later.
    Of course at the end of the day, we get a little more daylight, but that also means putting the little children and grandchildren to bed while it’s still daylight.

  • If you are a veteran or spouse of a veteran and you are in an assisted living community, or if you have a relative who is a veteran or spouse of a vet, I’m going to tell you about a program I just found out about last week.
    Of course, a lot of you are smarter than I am, so you probably know about this already. But I didn’t, and it cost my dad thousands of dollars over the years he was in assisted living before he died.

  • Our recent column about the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 was about further intrusion of our do-goody government into schools and homes. The Act created additional funding and policy for administration of the Department of Agriculture’s many food services programs – National School Lunch, National School Breakfast, Special Supplemental Nutrition, Child and Adult Care, and Summer Food Services.

  • The great divide in the nation was apparent in a small crowd at the County Commission auditorium last Saturday morning during a town meeting conducted by one of our local members of Congress, U.S. Rep. Cliff Stearns (R-Ocala).
    The small crowd was largely pro-Stearns and anti-Obama, but those who were in favor of the administration weren’t bashful about making their feelings known.
    That resulted in a couple of shouting incidents which were ugly at times.

  • Wednesday was my cousin’s birthday. If you look at the calendar, you’ll know why that is such a big deal.
    Her birthday only comes once every four years. She was born on Feb. 29, I won’t say what year.
    I can remember it being awfully hard to explain to a 5-year-old why her birthday is a date that isn’t on the calendar and has to be celebrated either the day before or the day after. That’s a tough thing to deal with at an early age.

  • The pull of gravity, spin of our planet, or trips around the sun may cause the U.S. Supreme Court to render occasional decisions with predictable long-term unintended consequences.
    One such decision was Dred Scott in 1857. As you recall from high school history, Dred Scott was a slave owned by Peter Blow, who sold him to John Emerson, an army doctor. Emerson was posted to several states, including Missouri, where slavery was illegal and slaves were permitted to purchase their freedom.

  • Last week was very busy for me. I spent a lot of time doing the paperwork involved in filing for an injunction … against myself.
    That’s right, I’m suing me.
    It’s all because some of our government officials seem to forget the first three words of the preamble to the U.S. Constitution; you know, the words “We the people.”