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Today's Opinions

  • How many generations

    will pay for this meltdown?

    The default of the quasi stocks and bonds cooked up by investment banks and Wall Street for their real estate interests was the trigger for our current economic collapse. But at the end of 2007 several other record-setting factors were also pulling at its seams.

    Home mortgage debt was $11.1 trillion. Consumer debt for credit cards, autos, student and personal loans was $2.6 trillion. One in every 35 households declared bankruptcy.

  • Will the bailout road ever end?

    Congress has been running around in circles since it handed $700 billion in bailout money to one man, Henry Paulson. The proposal was originally supposed to prop up the crumbling mortgage market that was in a crisis mode, but when he didn’t move funds timely to the banks, they started to buy up other banks and increase dividends to their investors, give employee raises and executives bonuses, instead of loaning the money out to citizens they were supposed to help. There were no strings attached to the funds so it was legal what the banks were doing.

  • Pre-mourning during a long demise

    Our fascination with newspapers began when there were 2,500 dailies and six times that many weeklies in the U.S. Our attachment was instant and has obviously persisted.

    National fascination with newspapers predates even Benjamin Franklin and his Pennsylvania Gazette, which began publication in 1730. The Pony Express carried papers across the continent to illiterate pioneers, who would gather ‘round to hear someone read the news.

  • Stang

    “It’s not hard to meet expenses...

    they’re everywhere!”

  • Auto bailouts to gardening by chance

    Regarding the great motorcar company bailouts; to start with, Chrysler has made it clear that it no longer intends to manufacture its own and intends to import Chinese cars; nothing for them. The general public is so-so about GM’s Detroit “bombs” over the years and wondered if they would ever get their act together. If one has read Delorean’s book about GM, it leaves no doubt about their inability to understand the marketplace and respond to it.

  • Sorry, George – mea culpa not accepted

    A pundit remarked recently that the president looked quite contrite, agreeable and almost worthy of sympathy. Yes we would all like to think he has experienced redemption and, in his new iteration, come to the awareness that he had made mistakes and is truly apologetic and that from now on, we will find a new, gentler Bush.

    Don’t count on it. Bush is a good ole’ get even boy from the Lee Atwater mode: Anything goes to achieve desired ends. The entire family is that way, including sweet mother.

  • History isn’t always black or white

    Sometimes we are chided by our readers for something we did or didn’t do. Most of the time it’s only a comment or two; on occasion there are a number of calls – and a few lengthy conversations.

    We try to learn something from all writers of e- and regular mail and the telephone callers. And once in a while,  we realize a common thread in those discourses is something we should have addressed.

  • More things you’d prefer not to know

    Ten years ago President Bill Clinton told the nation “the era of big government is over.” We don’t know whether he was wrong or telling another big one while wagging his finger at us. In any case, both sides of Congress applauded, which was awkward because they had their fingers crossed.

    However, despite differences, the Clinton White House and Speaker Newt Gingrich’s Republican Congress actually shrank the size of government, produced balanced budgets, and encouraged better than usual economic growth. Gridlock can be good. It encourages compromise.