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What's this world coming to?

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By David Davis

What’s this world coming to?

BLU3, a Pompano Beach Company has developed a line of ultra-portable tankless diving systems using surface-supplied air. The system supports a diver at its maximum depth of 10 feet for about an hour and it is compact enough to carry in a backpack.

The first in the line is NEMO, which is in the Kickstarter phase. NOMAD and NEPTUNE are scheduled for launch in the summer and winter of 2019. Those two, which are still in development will allow divers to go deeper depths. NEPTUNE will enable multiple divers on a single system.

BLU3 is raising funds through Kickstarter.

Kickstarter?

As its name implies, Kickstarter is a web-based funding platform for creative projects; everything from films, games and music to art, design and technology. Kickstarter is full of ambitious, innovative, and imaginative ideas brought to life through the direct support of others.

What’s this world coming to?

According to a New Atlas article, when a root canal is performed, the infected dental pulp inside a tooth is replaced with tiny rubber rods – unfortunately this leaves the tooth dead, and thus likely to become infected again. A new procedure, however, may be able to keep such teeth alive and strong.

Led by Drs. Vivek Kumar and Peter Nguyen, a team from the New Jersey Institute of Technology started with an existing peptide hydrogel that had previously been shown to stimulate angiogenesis (the growth of new blood vessels) when injected under the skin of mice and rats. The solution actually starts out as a liquid but self-assembles into a gel once injected.

They proceeded to add a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor, which stimulates dentinogenesis (the proliferation of dental pulp stem cells). When the mixture was introduced to cultured dental pulp stem cells, those cells not only proliferated, but they also began depositing calcium phosphate crystals, which make up tooth enamel.

Although this first version of the peptide hydrogel degraded soon after being injected under rats’ skin, a “much more stable version” has since been created. The scientists are now experimenting with injecting it into the teeth of dogs that have received root canals. If those experiments are successful, human trials could follow.

What is this world coming to?

According to Hubble.org, astronomers have just assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history, based on a broad spectrum of observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and other space and ground-based telescopes. In particular, Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, about 3 billion years after the big bang.

Astronomers using the ultraviolet vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have captured one of the largest panoramic views of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe. The field features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are forming stars. Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang.

Ultraviolet light has been the missing piece to the cosmic puzzle. Now, combined with infrared and visible-light data from Hubble and other space and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history.

The image straddles the gap between the very distant galaxies, which can only be viewed in infrared light, and closer galaxies, which can be seen across a broad spectrum. The light from distant star-forming regions in remote galaxies started out as ultraviolet. However, the expansion of the universe has shifted the light into infrared wavelengths. By comparing images of star formation in the distant and nearby universe, astronomers glean a better understanding of how nearby galaxies grew from small clumps of hot, young stars long ago.