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Opinion

  • Every true American will wish our incoming president success in his efforts to preserve, protect, and defend the nation and its liberty. In these troubled times our good wishes may be the only honeymoon card he’ll get.

    Mr. Obama cracked the whip on his own party as soon as the electoral votes were counted, telling Congress he wanted a stimulus package for the economy on his desk as soon as his buns hit the chair in the Oval Office. Congress is moseying along at political warped speed.

  • On Monday, Jan. 19, Marion County residents are invited to walk in the annual march honoring Martin Luther King Jr. The younger ones in the crowd won’t remember the turbulent times of the Civil Rights movement in the United States.

    They are too young to remember the arrest of Rosa Parks or to personally hear the speeches of Martin Luther King. They know only of the struggle for equal rights through the pages of history books and through stories told by their elders.

  • The MLK Jr. Commemorative Commission of Marion County will conclude a weeklong celebration of the birthday of one of the greatest figures of the 20th century with a call to service at “Day at the Park” on Monday, Jan. 19, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Martin Luther King Jr. complex.

  • A new stimulus package,

    and a $1 trillion in debt

    As the top consumers of the world’s products, we, the American shoppers, have become the most studied animals on the planet. Product manufacturers and their retail sales agents have us sorted and classified by sex, age, education, religion, race, housing, income and many other traits. They use all types of data in their computer models to predict what we want, when we want it and how much we will pay for it.

  • Are you ready for some “blockbuster” or “unbelievable” news regarding more loans being made - and we’re not talking about the $700 plus billion White House-approved package that the Treasury Department is rapidly going through?  Plus, now, they are even asking for more.

  • It’s Christmastime and the cultural mix that has become America is caught up in a celebration of life and hope. Not everyone participates – but most do – even those who aren’t very religious. We think of others and what may make them happy – whether it is a special present or the simple gift of food to those who don’t have much.

  • Winston Churchill observed that a fanatic is someone who cannot change his mind and will not change the subject. Talk radio has a number of that peculiar species.

    With Sir Winston’s wisdom in mind, we thought to look back over our own opinions and prognostications about the presidential campaign and its intense focus on change.

  • The Marion County Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Commission will present the 24th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Celebration. Marion County Public Information Officer Judge Cochran has been invited to act as spokesperson for the celebration.

    Prayer Breakfast/Legacy Pioneers Recognition: 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 17, at the Edward Croskey Center, 1410 N.W. 4th St. Tickets are $10. Call 351-0824.

    Ecumenical Service: 7 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 18, at First Assembly of God, 1827 N.E. 14th St. Call 732-0097.

  • In the early years after World War II, most folks were occupied with getting a job, buying a car, getting married, buying a second car, making babies, getting a bigger car, buying a house, mowing grass, and dreaming about a bigger house – with two bathrooms.

  • “It is blended coffee ...

    yesterday’s and today’s!”

     

  • Florida legislators have a tough job ahead of them, dealing with the newest budget crisis and the projected $2 billion shortfall in revenue. They are meeting in a two-week special session to decide just how to deal with shrinking state coffers.

    The housing market slump is one of the many reasons there’s a shortfall but a significant one, with home construction being one of the state’s largest industries. When buying a house, homeowners buy documentary stamps in proportion to the purchase price of the home.

  • For 88 years, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and its allies have fought for legal rulings that censor America’s Christian history and heritage to overturn our traditional values. Now it has taken this intolerant campaign to the next level by increasingly demanding jail for Christians who won’t comply.

    In Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, a private individual prayed before a school event and the ACLU issued a startling threat. “Their refusal to comply, (the censorship of religious speech) should and must result in their removal from society.”

  • Our ally Israel is dependent on American aid. What if we threatened them with the cancellation of aid if they don’t do what we want? Is that a possibility? Would they withdraw from Gaza and work toward a peace agreement?

    Will Israel then, after not being chastised for its highly suspect excuse to attack the Palestinians in Gaza become the stalking horse that makes it possible for America to come to her aid? Will Israel become the vehicle for another war – a war with a country four or five times larger than an Iraq that we cannot manage?

  • If we made any resolutions last year we don’t remember them. Aging has its prerogatives – a convenient memory being one of them.

    What should we do first this year? Grandma said in the old country it was against the law to read yesterday’s newspapers. So first thing we’ve got to do is sort through our clipping files and send old news to the recycler.

  • Come on, folks,

    buy American

    Now that two of the three American automobile corporations have been given some billions of our faithful taxpayers’ dollars, isn’t it about time we instituted a buy American campaign for American made automobiles? The bailout will do nothing for our auto industries unless we, the people, start buying their products.

    Thinking back, the good old days were when we had loyal Americans buying American products. Now we have every country in the world copying our cars and our people buying them.

  • Millions of homeowners and commercial property owners are asking when will real estate make its comeback? The evidence points to another disappointing year in 2009. Speculative real estate investing purchases and lax lending standards by many banks and mortgage companies led to a runaway real estate market that came crashing down when buyers were unable to afford their mortgages.

  • “It ain’t over ‘til it’s over,” baseball legend Yogi Berra is credited with saying. This summary of several financial reports is for informational purposes only. It is based on excerpts from broadcasts and speculation from some top banking officials: It has not been documented by or commented on by the treasury or the government.

  • With our country mired in the worst economic situation since the depression of 1929, due to our government’s “bailout” of, first, Wall Street firms, banks and mortgage companies, they then shift the program to credit cards, college loans and auto loans, to finally the big three auto makers. We will reserve judgment on all of this at this time because we’ve discovered, thanks to Tom DeWeese, a far more sinister threat to our way of life. It’s hard to believe it’s coming out at just this time of our lives.

  • Today is Boxing Day. Next week on this day we will already be in a new year, Jan. 2, 2009. Many will have sung Auld Lang Syne, or part of it, on New Years’ Eve.

    But there is another song, now lost, which was sung in England along with Burns’ well-known poem. If memory serves correctly,  it goes something like the following:

    I saw the old homesteads and faces I loved,

    I saw England’s valleys and dells.

    I listened with joy as I did when a boy,

    to the sound of the old village bells.

    The log was burning brightly,

  • As this New Year dawns, the changing face of the Corridor is apparent to those who have been here a while. Several years ago the community had a strong rural identity.

    Today that dynamic has changed as more people have moved into the gated and ungated developments, and the area feels more like a small city instead of a few isolated neighborhoods along a two-lane country road.