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Features

  • So far the New Year and I have gotten along quite famously. If the rest of the year goes as well as the first week it will be a wonderful year. I love it when a plan comes together – especially when it’s mine.

    Then the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage disrupted my amicable muse. She emerged from my office and said most defiantly, "You need to be more organized. I don’t know how you find anything in that office?"

  • Although never a real fan of Sue Grafton, I have over the years picked up one or two of her novels which I often found underwhelming. But her latest, T Is for Trespass, has to be tops in the alphabet series because in Solana Rojas she has created evil incarnate.

  • Your retirement lifestyle will depend not only on your assets and investment choices but also on how quickly you draw down your retirement portfolio. The annual percentage that you take out of your portfolio, whether from returns or the principal itself, is known as your withdrawal rate. Figuring out an appropriate withdrawal rate is a key issue in retirement planning and pre-sents many challenges.

  • Primitive tribes throughout the world have great reverence for the Earth and a deep connection to the Source of All Life. We, on the other hand, are so sophisticated that we have forgotten who we are.

    We’re so caught up with our ego-self and getting and spending; greed has consumed us and no one is ever satisfied. We criticize and judge and create disharmony within and around us. This impacts our immune system.

  • The marathon holiday season starts with getting stuffed at Thanksgiving, continues with buying presents and decorating which culminates with Christmas, then ends with the New Year’s celebration. With the holidays now over, our waistlines are bulging, not our wallets, and our lives have returned to “normal.”

    Pleasant memories linger on of parties, celebrations, and attending church or temple. By now we have returned those gifts that don’t fit or are the wrong color and have stored the things we will “re-gift.”

  • Did you get a new puppy for Christmas? Is it a little daunting to try to think of all the things that you need to do for your new pet? Well here is a short list that will go a long way toward keeping your little one healthy and happy.

  • Friends of Freedom Public Library invite Corridor residents to the annual meeting Saturday, Jan. 17, at 1 p.m. in the library meeting room, because we are going to have a fashion show.

    The immediate business, voting in the new officers, will be attended to first as required in the by-laws. Candidates will be presented to the membership: Patricia (Pat) Babski, president; Kermit Clark, vice president; Joan Richards, secretary; Janet Wise, treasurer. After nominations are heard and accepted from the floor, voting will proceed.

  • Here it is, another New Year, and for most of us we are glad the old one has passed into history. Gone is the craziness of the holiday season and its excesses. We are left with the stark reality of the times and how we will  manage our lives in the coming year.

    In the Jewish tradition the whole celebration of a New Year is completely different from the secular one. There is no kissing of strangers at midnight or the wearing of funny hats. Nobody gets so drunk as to need designated drivers and nobody has hangovers the next day.

  • Bob Waite rhymes with stained glass. Well, of course it doesn’t, but 50 years ago Bob Waite did discover stained glass making in his first and only class during an adult education program at Canton, in way, way Upstate New York. From then on he just read a lot of books, corrected a lot of mistakes and bandaged a lot of cut fingers.

    Ironically Bob wound up teaching stained glass at the Brasher Falls, N.Y. high school some years later.

  • There was a delightful response to my Sadie column. Even Sadie remarked, “Did I do all those things?” God love her. Thanks so much to all who called and e-mailed such nice compliments.

    The featured group in this column is the Billiard Boys. They have been very patient, especially because their picture was taken weeks ago.

    The “boys” have an 8-ball bunch, who play from 2:30 to 5 p.m. This is “open billiards” and is played Monday through Friday. Residents and non-residents are welcome but no one under the age of 18.

  • For more recipes and food information from Relish, click here:

    RELISH

    For other culinary delights, click the photos below.

     

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  • Yesterday, on New Year’s Day, many probably got up to a spouse saying, “Wake up and smell the roses; the Rose Bowl parade is on.” After a night of celebrating the coming of 2009, perhaps with Four Roses, viewing a parade with its profusion of all kinds of flowers could be the best way to recover from a hangover.

    Today we’ll parade a few puns down the Alley – and see if any of them float your boat.

    Blooming Idiot

  • The holidays are a time for fun, food, decorations and activities with friends and families. While you enjoy the season keep in mind that many of our winter habits and holiday traditions pose potential hazards to our pets.

    Here are some tips to keep in mind to insure your pets stay healthy and happy during the holidays.

    In this season of overeating you need to keep your pet on a normal diet. Even one meal of greasy, spicy or fatty foods can give your pet severe indigestion and/or diarrhea. So no leftovers for Rover, no matter how much he begs.

  • During its regular meeting Dec. 17, the Freedom Quilters donated to the library an impressive king-size quilt and a wall hanging in a chicken scratch design. These works of art were created by most of the group’s 32 members, says group leader Jeannine Sirkoch.

  • The Christmas season is over, finally. The only aide memoire is the Christmas tree mutely standing in the corner of our living room. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and Yours Truly were sitting in the living room drinking our morning cup of coffee and silently staring at the ghost of Christmas recently passed.

    Silence tiptoed down the hall. Almost out of nowhere, I heard a deep sigh from the only other occupant of the room. Then she said, “I’m glad Christmas is over.”

  • My Chanukah memory happened more than 50 years ago. It was a gentler time and much less technologically advanced. There were no cell phones, personal computers, fax machines or microwaves, and if you wanted a toy to do something, well, you had to do it yourself.

  • Some die-hard fans of Michael Connelly have said that he frequently robs them of a full night’s sleep – particularly when they start one of his novels after 10 p.m. Surely, that must be the case for his latest, The Brass Verdict, in which he brings together two main characters from different series, a trend many mystery writers like Robert Parker are eagerly following.

  • Sitting here and seeing the wind move the now almost leafless trees brings back memories of past Christmas seasons and things that happened or were done to add a bit more spice to the holiday period. One such memory was our quest to gain or at best earn more liquid assets so that we might better enjoy the season’s offerings.

  • Only a few days ago the outside decorations were finished, the tree put up with all its trimmings, and presents all wrapped. It all made me feel dead tired, so I settled in for some Christmas Eve television viewing. The news program started with, “Donner and Blitzen have elected to take the early reindeer retirement package, triggering a good deal of concern about whether they will be replaced, and about other restructuring decisions at the North Pole.”