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Today's News

  • They survived ‘Pearl’ but time takes its toll

    It was once easier to remember Pearl Harbor Day because Dec. 7 was far enough from Christmas that the holiday hubbub had not begun. Like other traditions, it is customary to interview survivors of the “day of infamy” for the issue on or near that anniversary. But the commercial side of Christmas gets an earlier start each season and those survivors are much harder to find. It was 67 years ago and even a 17-year-old serviceman would be 84 by now – and they had to first live through World War II.

  • Shopping for serious bargains

    Analysts have been making predictions for weeks about the seasonal holiday sales. Though many forecasted the gift giving season would be slow, it was hard to tell on black Friday.

  • She’s serious about horsin’ around

    Most people when they’re young can’t wait to grow older. Many when they are old wish they were young once again. Both ways are not a good way to be.

    Every stage in life is different. Each has its own gifts and qualities. It’s best to let go of each stage so the next one can happen.

    Accept impermanence, realizing nothing is forever. Learning to live in the now makes for a fuller, more contented life.

  • How many generations

    will pay for this meltdown?

    The default of the quasi stocks and bonds cooked up by investment banks and Wall Street for their real estate interests was the trigger for our current economic collapse. But at the end of 2007 several other record-setting factors were also pulling at its seams.

    Home mortgage debt was $11.1 trillion. Consumer debt for credit cards, autos, student and personal loans was $2.6 trillion. One in every 35 households declared bankruptcy.

  • Legends shrouded in the mists of time

    He rises up from the mist, a man-like creature formed from the soft clay earth, his birth attended by three learned sages whispering incantations from an ancient text. The creature has a parchment in its mouth, on it is written the ineffable name of God.

    This creature, a humanoid without a soul or personality, is ready to do work at his master’s bidding. The huge monster of a man with an uneven stiff-legged gait stands posed and ready, eager to wield his brute force when prompted.

  • The power of dividends in a portfolio

    It wasn’t so long ago that many investors regarded dividends as roughly the financial equivalent of a record turntable at a gathering of MP3 users – a throwback to an earlier era, irrelevant to the real action. But fast forward a few years and things look different.

  • Adrift in the sea of portion control

    Author Stewart O’Nan has sometimes been labeled “the bard of the working class.” And in this 146-page gem of a novel the hero is a 35-year-old manager of a Red Lobster restaurant tucked at the end of a hardscrabble mall. It is five days before Christmas and headquarters has determined that Manny De Leon’s place is not meeting the numbers and must close.

  • Will the bailout road ever end?

    Congress has been running around in circles since it handed $700 billion in bailout money to one man, Henry Paulson. The proposal was originally supposed to prop up the crumbling mortgage market that was in a crisis mode, but when he didn’t move funds timely to the banks, they started to buy up other banks and increase dividends to their investors, give employee raises and executives bonuses, instead of loaning the money out to citizens they were supposed to help. There were no strings attached to the funds so it was legal what the banks were doing.

  • Scouts saddle up for Camporee

    This fall’s Boy Scout Camporee at Camp Shands in Melrose was attended by more than 200 scouts and leaders from Ocala and surrounding areas. The theme this year was Wild West Weekend.

    Each troop was to build a “covered wagon” to be mounted on 2 by 4s with a plywood floor but no wheels were to be used.

    Only boy power was to be used to carry the wagons. The covered part could be decorated with a Wild West theme.

    A race was to be held Saturday night with the wagons. The race kept the "horses" warm as well as the spectators.

  • Pre-mourning during a long demise

    Our fascination with newspapers began when there were 2,500 dailies and six times that many weeklies in the U.S. Our attachment was instant and has obviously persisted.

    National fascination with newspapers predates even Benjamin Franklin and his Pennsylvania Gazette, which began publication in 1730. The Pony Express carried papers across the continent to illiterate pioneers, who would gather ‘round to hear someone read the news.