Today's News

  • It’s pet and animal week, so give ‘em a hug

    Animals are in the news this week as we celebrate both National Pet Week and Be Kind To Animals Week.  These weeks end tomorrow, so be sure to give your pets a hug before then.  But be careful with your goldfish.

    Some of Pun Alley’s pet stories follow:


    “ Mary! How’s your new pet fish doing?  You told me he was something special.”

    “ I’m disappointed in him.  The guy who sold him to me said I could teach him to talk like a parrot.”

  • Time for local government to step up or step out

    While there has been some positive economic news on the national front and optimism out of Washington, our state and local economic outlook remains bleak.

  • Green thumbs share gardening secrets

    May is the month for the Members’ Forum for the Oak Run Garden Club.

    Throughout the year, we invite guest gardening, landscaping, and conservation experts to share their knowledge with us. Once a year, our own Garden Club Member Experts present a program on their areas of interest and expertise. On Wednesday, May 6, the program includes "Gardening in Small Spaces" (Connie Fangman); "Pest Control, Inside and Out" (Madeline Braisted); "Gardening in the Shade" (Nancy Frost); and "My Very Favorite Plants( I think)" (Linda Spring).

  • Spare Change is loaded with suspense and humor

    Parker’s Spenser in a skirt is divorced, thirtyish Sunny Randall, a former cop turned PI and daughter of the much venerated Phil Randall, recently called out of retirement to help with a resurfaced serial killer tagged Spare Change because he always leaves coins on or near his victims after shooting them once in the head. It’s been twenty years since Phil, leading the old task force, exhausted all his leads.

  • Corridor getting new 40-acre park

    It’s official. The 200 Corridor will get a new 40-acre park, but when it will be open to visitors is unknown.

    Pat Gabriel, president of Parks and Recreation Advisory Council (PRAC), said it would be more than a year before the design plans for the property get under way. “It takes awhile,” she said to get a park “online.” The design process has been budgeted for October 2010.

  • Sun Valley home burglarized

    On April 23, a woman returned to her S.W. 38th Avenue home and discovered a Playstation II, Playstation portable gaming system and several games were missing from her son’s bedroom, according to a sheriff’s report.

    After speaking with her son, the woman learned that one of the controllers to the gaming system had been unplugged and was left behind. Also, the suspect failed to take any wires to the system or the power source. The teen’s IPOD touch was also reported missing. The total amount of the loss was more than $900.

    Owner spots customer

  • Students move beyond the classroom

    How does one properly pour tea during the very beautiful and formal Chinese tea ceremony and why is it important in their culture?

    What is the significance of the colors red, black and gold that are so widely used in Asian decorations and culture. Likewise, why bamboo?

    Why is there so much art involved in the preparation of Asian cuisine?

  • Letters to the Editor - May 8, 2009

    FairTax could be

    our salvation

    I recently attended a TEA party on April 15 in Ocala. I was impressed by the turnout, the honking horns in support of the protesters and the angry but calm demeanor of the people. Everyone was there to show their displeasure with the unrestrained spending and oppressive taxing habits of Congress. It doesn’t matter what your party affiliation may be, the people know that Congress is out of control.

  • Moms honored at a special early breakfast

    Marion Landing celebrated Mother’s Day a bit early two weeks ago with our annual breakfast honoring resident mothers, orchestrated by Joe Raffony’s team of hubbys. There was a super turnout with all but one male prep and service, great food and even a long- stemmed rose for each mother attending.

  • Joining the fight

    Although those walking the first lap at Friday evening’s Relay for Life at West Port High School wore the same dark purple T-shirt saying they were cancer survivors, each person’s story was different.

    It was 1987 when Odin Olson, On Top of the World, first learned he had lymphoma. Chemotherapy was necessary. He has had several relapses in the past but now he is in remission.

    Duane Ulery moved to Oak Run two weeks ago. As he walked the first lap, his wife Janet snapped photos of her husband with the plan to send them to back to his doctor in Ohio.