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Today's Features

  • Have you gone shopping for CDs and DVDs and viewed all sorts of formats? The question is which one to buy.

    First, let me talk about CD RW and DVD RW. These allow you to read, write, erase, and write again. This sounds great, but there is a problem since they do not act like an external or jump drive.

  • Recently, we have considered the merits of simple, natural treatments for pain and other ailments. These centered on the increased delivery of oxygen to our cells.

    Cellular oxygen increased as a result of enhanced blood circulation. Chief among these was the use of ribose to enhance production of cellular energy.

    Then we encountered the unusual procedure developed by Dr. John Sarno. He employed stress-reduction techniques.

  • I expect that most, if not all, Corridor communities publish their own resident newsletter. It may be weekly, monthly or quarterly on one sheet of paper or more, but someone, somehow gathers, assembles and distributes their community’s news.

  • An item on the evening news pointed out a growing problem with many people, which they called sleep deprivation. I never heard of this before and until recently, I was never interested in this subject. Now, I find I am part of a big company.

    Whoever said misery loves company has never suffered from sleep deprivation. It does not comfort me in the least to know that other people have the same difficulty going to sleep at night. What would comfort me is a good night’s sleep.

  • In their ground-breaking biography of the world’s best known preacher, Billy Graham, and his relationship with 11 sitting presidents, two highly acclaimed journalists have recorded hundreds of hours of personal recollections. To his credit, Graham demanded no preconditions and asked only for fairness.

    The authors pick up the amazing trajectory of Graham’s career as a magnetic evangelist in the year 1949. At this time, Graham was essentially resurrecting something dead for years — tent revivals.

  • In 1737, Irish immigrants began observing St. Patrick’s Day in Boston and held the first parade in New York City in 1766. Now, the tradition continues with almost everybody wearing green, being honorary Irish, and eating corned beef and cabbage.

    In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, on this coming Monday, Pun Alley is decked out in green and will have some Irish fun.

    Taken to the Cleaners

    Patrick O’Reilly was lucky. Since the day he had found a four-leaf clover, everything good seemed to come his way.

  • March is Pet Nutrition Month so let’s explore what your pet needs to thrive. Wild animals manage to survive on what they find to eat but their life span is far shorter than our domestic pets.

    Today’s manufactured pet foods are carefully formulated to keep all of our pets’ biological systems functioning well at all times, but there are so many choices that it can get confusing. What about home cooking? Should you supplement with vitamins?

  • With all the hype and hoopla concerning our non-existent immigration policy and the resistance of our so-called illegal immigrants’ failure to use our native tongue makes me remember several instances that were both humorous and informational. Early in my career with General Motors in Doraville, Georgia we had the occasion to become friends with the morning watch commander of the Doraville Police Department.

  • The Jewish holiday of Purim (which occurs this year on March 21) celebrates the Jews’ deliverance from the hands of the wicked Haman in ancient Persia. It is customary to masquerade, poke fun, write satire and have a good time. In honor of the holiday, I offer the following.

    In the news:

    A herd of Texas longhorns escaped from a ranch into the woods along Route 44 in Hernando. When asked about the incident, the owner, James Maverick, explained it was all a big miss-steak.

  • On this day in 1876 Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for the telephone. When seniors think about telephones, the image of an old antique crank wall phone comes to mind, while the younger generation considers an antique telephone to be a black thing having a dial with numbered holes.

    Now, telephones are so tiny that most people carry them around. Obviously, telephone lines run through Pun Alley with some phoney stories.