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Playing the game in Dallas and Dubai

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By Jim Flynn

The posted price of gasoline on every highway is a daily reminder that government is powerless over our economy, no matter how much it spends.

In January 2001, Mr. Bush’s first significant presidential act was creation of the National Energy Policy Development Group (NJPDG). It became better known as the Cheney Energy Task Force.

The deliberations of the Cheney Task Force have been more top secret than guided missile locations, and with good reason. It is known, but unconfirmed that one of its first acts was a meeting with senior officials of major oil companies. We’d guess more than oil was discussed

Congress, the Sierra Club, Judicial Watch and environmental groups have been unsuccessful in prying details out of the Task Force through the Freedom of Information Act and lawsuits. In Congressional hearings, oil company executives were suffering infectious memory lapse.

So what do we know and when did we know it? We and Congress knew before they took office that the president and vice president came to office from Texas and were pals with everybody who’s anybody in the energy industries. Those pals were their primary campaign contributors.

We know industrial economies of the world depend on oil for their survival. We also know, or should know by now, that oil will be a major factor in our lives until the wells run dry.

We’ve never doubted that even before the Energy Task Force was formed, the Bush Administration had decided continued access to the world’s energy supply would require a large on-the-ground commitment in the Middle East. Task Force documents disclosed by the Commerce Department (probably by mistake) included maps and plans of the oil fields, refineries, terminals, and building projects of Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

The president’s “axis of evil” speech, naming Iraq and Iran, was on Jan. 20, 2002. It was an unsubtle hint that war was on the way. The earlier attack on the World Trade Center had provided public support and cover for the White House’s predisposition to go to war against Iraq.

During his recent greeting of Republican presidential nominee John McCain, President Bush said for the umpteenth time that we have to “get off oil.” We didn’t believe him then; we don’t believe him now.

Since the OPEC oil embargo in 1973, Washington has known our dependence on oil makes us vulnerable to terrorists and tin-horn dictators around the world. Successive administrations have done nothing to curb that dependence.

Lately, political candidates and our House and Senate leaders have been floating feel-good silliness, such as a summer moratorium on the 18-cent federal gas tax and a temporary suspension of the strategic petroleum reserves, neither of which will have any beneficial effect on our problems.

Our political candidates this year are talking about more conservation, more research, more nuclear, more solar, more wind, more clean fuels, and more domestic drilling. Conservationists have an objection to every proposed alternative except bicycles and backpacking.

In the meantime it is more descriptive of the state of world energy to remind Americans that oil supplies depend on Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, Vladimir Putin in Russia, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in Iran, and a number of unsteady regimes in places such as Nigeria and Sudan.

The price of oil on the world market rises whenever the supply seems threatened. Price is not controlled by major oil companies.

Their good fortune is that they are positioned to raise their prices every time the cost of crude goes up, and some additional profit on their cost increase.

Mr. Cheney’s former employer, Halliburton, announced recently that it will open a new corporate headquarters in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and will station its chief executive officer there. Halliburton’s major competitor in the oil services industry also has an office in Dubai.

Their obvious conclusion is that the future of oil production is not in the U.S.

Oil company advertisements which extol their interest in developing clean energy are mostly wind. They are interested in research subsidies and tax credits.

Exxon-Mobil, Halliburton, and their competitors expect to be in the oil business until the last barrel is pumped.

By then their stockholders expect them to be in control of whatever new sources of energy have been developed at taxpayer expense. That’s how the game is played.

Jim Flynn was formerly a corporate counsel, served in military intelligence during the Korean War, and once aspired to be a newspaper columnist.

The Bush Administration had

The Bush Administration had decided continued access to the world’s energy supply would require a large on-the-ground commitment in the Middle East. Task Force documents disclosed by the Commerce Department.
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Oil company advertisements

Oil company advertisements which extol their interest in developing clean energy are mostly wind. They are interested in research subsidies and tax credits. ski lessons la-tania

We apperceive automated

We apperceive automated economies of the apple depend on oil for their survival. We aswell know, jeux de moto or should apperceive by now, that oil will be a above agency in our lives until the wells run dry. Giochi Per Ragazze

During his contempo greeting

During his contempo greeting of Republican presidential appointee John McCain, jeux de voiture President Bush said for the umpteenth time that we accept to “get off oil.” We didn’t accept him then, jeux de mario we don’t accept him now.

Since the OPEC oil embargo in

Since the OPEC oil embargo in 1973, jogos de motos Washington has accepted our assurance on oil makes us accessible to terrorists and tin-horn dictators about the world. jeux de cuisine Successive administrations accept done annihilation to barrier that dependence.